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Advertisment The . 30 Carbine cartridge is an interesting one, with an interesting history. It’s not a round most people are familiar with, despite its impact on the world.

.30 Carbine A Complete Guide (Ammo, History and Guns)

.30 Carbine  A Complete Guide (Ammo, History and Guns)Advertisment The .30 Carbine cartridge is an interesting one, with an interesting history. It’s not a round most people are familiar with, despite its impact on the world. I mean, this is essentially the first “intermediate cartridge” and the overall design goal for this would eventually lead to the 5.56 NATO/.223 that we all know and love today. This round, and the rifle it was designed to be fired from, the M1 Carbine , had a substantial impact on the way the US fought its wars, and both are still relevant today. Want to know more about the .30 Carbine? Let’s dig into the history of this somewhat unknown caliber, and talk about where it is today. History Shortly before the outbreak of WWII, the US Army had a problem. Namely, the M1 Garand , that legendary battle rifle that beat the Nazis, was too heavy. At least for support personnel. Imagine: It’s 1938, Germany is making ugly noises throughout Europe, Japan is rattling its sabers (katanas?) and the latest war to end all wars is imminent. You’re a radio operator or maybe an artilleryman, and in addition to your regular field kit and radio/mortar equipment, you also have to carry a full-sized rifle that weighs about 10lbs and is constantly getting in the way, whether carried or slung across your back. Now, you can’t just leave that rifle behind. Going into any combat situation with just a pistol vs rifles and machine guns is just asking for trouble. But you’re also going to be dramatically encumbered by bringing it along. The US Army attempted to address this problem with its carbine program which sought to develop a weapon that was “more than a pistol but less than a rifle.” Remember that phrase as it’s basically the defining parameter of the .30 Carbine. The goal was to develop something that would give officers, artillerymen, radio operators, medics, and other support staff more defensive power than the M1911 sidearm, but without the extra encumbrance of the M1 Garand. What they would eventually settle on was the M1 Carbine chambered in .30 Carbine. The .30 Carbine did a great job of bridging the gap between the .45 ACP round fired by the M1911 and the Thompson Submachine Gun , and the .30-06 round fired by the Garand and the BAR. The M1 Carbine quickly earned a reputation as an effective infantry weapon for support troops. Again, more than a pistol, less than a rifle. The Army also quickly realized that paratroopers jumping with full-length rifles was an untenable prospect at best, and a disaster waiting to happen at worst, so the original M1 carbine design was quickly modified to accommodate folding stocks for paratrooper operations. In the years during and immediately following WWII, millions of M1 carbines were produced, and they stayed in use all the way up to the end of Vietnam and even today they can be found in the hands of some rural police forces, as well as civilian gun collections. During this time, the .30 Carbine earned its place as an excellent “intermediate” cartridge and though it would eventually be replaced by the 5.56×45 in most applications (as would the .30-06 of the Garand), it is still produced in huge numbers today. Today and Ballistics Modern .30 Carbine ammo has come an awfully long way, and owners of original or reproduction M1 carbines have a host of excellent ammo options available beyond the rather anemic (by today’s standards) 110gr FMJ that was originally developed for use with the M1. Ballistically, the .30 carbine is never going to win any awards for a long-range round, but for a defensive weapon designed to be fired at ranges that are “more than (what you want to shoot with) a pistol, but less than (what you can do with) a rifle”? It still fills that niche perfectly. Modern .30 Carbine ammo like Hornday’s 110gr FTX leaves a carbine-length barrel at almost 1900fps…nearly double what the original 110gr FMJs of WWII were capable of. And that extra power is pushing a modern hollow point that is absolutely devastating at self-defense ranges , even through several layers of clothing. You can also get an incredibly stout load like Buffalo Bore’s Full Power+ FMJ which leaves the muzzle at over 2100fps in a carbine-length gun. That gives you a muzzle energy of 1,077ft-lbs. That’s greater than a 220gr .44 Magnum defensive load from a handgun. That’s certainly nothing to sneeze at when it comes to distances inside 100 yards, which is more than enough for defensive-distance use. Out of a pistol , that recoil is going to be rather stout, but fired from a 5lb rifle like an M1 Carbine or a reproduction? Even the most recoil-sensitive shooters will be able to wield it effectively. The M1 Carbine So, .30 Carbine ammo is alive and well…what about the gun it was designed for, the old M1? Like I said before, there are still millions of wartime models out there, but the reproduction market is strong as well. Let’s talk about some of these guns in depth because chances are if you’re interested in .30 Carbine, you’re interested in the M1 as well. The Original M1 Carbine If you’re looking for an original M1 Carbine, condition is going to be the big deciding factor in how much you pay. A service grade paratrooper model is going to run you over $3000 easily, and collector grade offerings often go for $5,000 or more depending on if any of the original equipment is present also. A lower grade model might cost you $1000-$1500 if you catch a pawn shop or gun show one being sold by someone in a good mood. These wartime models are still solid and dependable, but if you’re just looking for something for defensive use or for plinking -a “shooter” instead of a wall-hanger, in other words- give one of the reproductions a try. If you want to own a piece of history however, you could certainly do worse than the M1 Carbine. This is a tangible piece of firearms history that you can proudly display, and even hunt or defend your life and loved ones with. Inland Manufacturing M1 Carbine If you don’t quite have “WWII antique” money to spend, or you’re looking for something that can sit in a toolbox without worry, Inland Manufacturing (not the original Inland Manufacturing, but a company that has taken over the name) makes an excellent reproduction of that fateful carbine in the spirit of the original. This gun is commonly seen at M1 Carbine Matches and is a great home-defense choice for someone looking for a carbine solution. They also look very, very good and take advantage of modern machining and manufacturing advances to give you a gun that quite honestly performs even better than the original does accuracy-wise. They’re typically available for around $1000, and as with all things M1 the paratrooper version is a little more expensive. Auto Ordnance M1 Carbine Auto-Ordnance (now owned by Kahr) was one of the very first companies to start making new M1 carbines. A-O makes all the parts for these carbines new in their Worcester, MA facility on a computerized production line…a far cry from the way the first M1’s were hastily thrown together by anyone the government could find with a machine shop, including a jukebox manufacturer . The new A-O Carbines have a Parkerized finish and walnut furniture. All models, including the paratrooper version, are faithfully accurate recreations of the original carbines, making them great for those who want to own a piece of Americana, maybe a piece similar to what Grandpa carried, but don’t want to pay used car prices for an original model. What Other Firearms are Chambered in .30 Carbine? Of course, .30 Carbine isn’t just for M1 Carbines, even if those are far and away the most popular guns chambered in the caliber. Here are some other great guns chambered in .30 Carbine. Ruger Blackhawk Ruger’s Blackhawk is one of the best selling modern single-action revolvers on the planet, and certainly one of the most reliable and widely-available. It is available in a variety of calibers, including of course the .30 Carbine. These revolvers are absolutely bombproof, 100% reliable, and available just about anywhere guns are sold, though you may have to hunt around online to find a .30 Carbine version. Recoil is stiff, but not unmanageable. Remember, you have a big, heavy, steel frame to soak up a lot of that energy, and the Blackhawk is agreeable all the way up to the .454 Casull range. If you’re looking for a compliment to a larger .30 Carbine gun, this is also a great choice. These guns are accurate, and make for a great companion in bear country, although I’d opt for the .44 Magnum or .454 Casull versions over the .30 Carbine version if I were looking for bear defense. Inland M1 Advisor Okay, this is technically an M1 Carbine variant, but I’m including it because A) its a new-manufactured product that’s very different from your standard M1, and B) there just aren’t that many modern firearms that are still made that aren’t an M1, sorry guys. The Inland Advisor is basically just a cut-down M1 Carbine with a pistol-length barrel and a pistol grip. It’s basically an M1 Pistol. Why does this exist? Well in the latter part of the M1’s duty cycle, it was used heavily in Vietnam. The “Advisor” part comes from the fact that this gun was used extensively by special forces advisors and “tunnel rats” who found the gun to be extremely effective for operations in tight environments and dense jungles. These folks either didn’t have, or just weren’t impressed with the M16, which was kind of a mess at the time, and so they went to a modified version of the old standby, the M1. Today, Inland makes a factory version of this design that gives you a true M1 Carbine pistol that’s even more accurate and reliable than the original. These are a fun novelty but also a great “truck gun” or just general defensive choice for those looking for something different. I wouldn’t exactly call it a concealed carry option though unless you’re big into trench coats. What’s the Best .30 Carbine Ammo? Of course, all these guns aren’t much use without something to feed them with. Here are some great ammo options. Buffalo Bore Full-Power+ If you’re looking to get the absolute most out of your .30 Carbine firearm, "Buffalo Bore’s Full" -Power+ load is a good place to start. This load gives you .44 Magnum energy out of a M1 Carbine barrel…not too shabby for a round that’s almost 100 years old. Hornady FTX Critical Defense Hornady’s Critical Defense line is one of the industry standards when it comes to controlled-expansion hollow points specifically designed for self-defense. I carry this stuff in 9mm on a daily basis, and I’ve seen what most of their offerings do to ballistics gel. I have no problems recommending it to someone looking to use their .30 Carbine firearm for defensive purposes. Prvi Partizan FMJ There are a number of quality FMJ offerings out there for .30 Carbine that don’t have much to distinguish them from each other. Tula, Wolf, and Prvi Partizan are all fairly cheap, or for just a few cents more you can upgrade to something like Remington UMC. All are about the same, quality-wise. Parting Shots .30 Carbine may have been around for a long time, but that doesn’t mean it’s past its use-by date just yet. This venerable round still has some fight in it and is used all over the world. It’s especially important to those who own M1 Carbines, either new models or original. These old (or just old school) guns can still hold their own for everything from hunting to self-defense and are great fun to own and shoot.

[How-To] Rack a Pistol Slide With Weak Hands

[How-To] Rack a Pistol Slide With Weak Hands

Trending: Best Places to Buy Ammo Online and [Buyer's Guide] 7 Best AR-15s Have you ever felt like a fragile flower because you had trouble racking the slide on your semi-automatic handgun? Do you pass your weapon off to your boyfriend/brother/husband/grandson when you need to rack the slide? Worried you won’t have time to do that in a real self-defense situation? (Hint: You won’t.) “Excuse me Mr. Violent Rapist, could you hold on just a second while I call my boyfriend to come rack this slide for me?” How to rack a slide midline Thankfully, there is a secret to racking a slide for those of us with weak hands, and it doesn’t involve hitting the free weights at the gym. It’s all about technique. Not muscle. If you’re sporting a semi-auto pistol and having a hard time snatching that slide all the way to the rear, keep reading. We’ve got some tips to help you rack your sidearm like a badass, even if you have weak hands. Table of Contents Loading... You Don’t Need to Hit the Gym You don’t need man hands and big biceps to rack the slide on your handgun. It actually takes very little muscle when you do it right. There are plenty of shooters with man hands and big biceps that are doing it wrong. The difference between them and us (Yes. I have felt like a fragile flower, too) is they have enough upper body strength to muscle their way through it. Leg day? Never heard of it. We don’t. The problem occurs when those big, strong guys (with plenty of testosterone on their side) pass their pistols to their sister/wife/girlfriend/grandma. Unfortunately, they can’t walk her through the process of racking the slide because they don’t know the proper technique. When she can’t muscle the slide back like they do, the guys chalk it up to weak hands or bird arms. While it may seem funny to you big guys, it leaves those poor girls feeling inadequate, helpless, and incapable of handling a modern pistol. Don’t worry, ladies (or anyone else with weak hands). We’ve got you covered. Someone broke into the wrong house. Here is a step by step breakdown of the proper technique for racking a slide. Practice up, and you’ll be racking that slide like a pro in no time. Proper Technique for Racking a Slide The secret to racking the slide on your pistol is to focus on pushing the weapon with your dominant hand rather than pulling the slide with your weaker side. Sounds counterintuitive, doesn’t it? Trust me. Just follow these simple steps: Step 1 Grasp the handgun firmly by the grip using your firing hand. Keep your finger off the trigger and the muzzle pointed in a safe direction. Step 2 Place the heel of your support hand on the slide serrations and wrap your fingers over the slide. Grasp the serrations on the opposite side with the four fingers of your support hand. Do not cover the ejection port. Firm grip Step 3 While holding the slide firmly, punch the firing hand forward. This isn’t the time to be dainty. The movement should be fast, strong, and forceful…like a good old-fashioned bar room punch. Although you may pull the slide back slightly as you punch, the focus should be on punching the gun forward (or slightly angled to the side), not pulling the slide back. Punch it! Step 4 Once the slide reaches its rearmost position, let it go. Don’t ride the slide forward or with your support hand. Just let the spring do its job. I promise it doesn’t need your help. Riding or following the slide forward can cause a frustrating jam. Other Tips and Tricks If you’re still having trouble racking the slide even after following these steps, here are a few other convenient tips and tricks. Don’t be Afraid of Your Gun These weapons definitely deserve a healthy dose of respect, but I’ve seen far too many newbies handle their sidearm with nothing but their fingertips. It’s like they think the firearm might reach out and slap them if they aren’t gentle. It’s okay to handle your weapon with some authority. If you don’t feel very authoritative, fake it ‘til you make it. I promise you aren’t going to break your pistol. Those things are designed to withstand an internal explosion that produces internal pressures of somewhere near 27,000 psi every time you fire a shot (and that’s if you’re shooting standard 9mm). A little hand pressure isn’t going to cause your pistol to crumble in your fingers. Keep It Close Humans are naturally stronger at their midline, so pull your pistol in toward your belly button to harness more essential muscle strength. Also, make sure not to flare your elbows out to the side. Keep them tucked close to your body. At your midline for strength! Use Your Shoulder Still having trouble? Lean forward slightly and point your shoulder as you throw that punch with your dominant hand. You can also think about punching downward at an angle rather than straight out in front of you. Safety First It’s easy to get caught up in the goal of racking the slide and in the process get careless with gun safety. Consider this a friendly reminder to always play it safe. Muzzle Safety Resist the temptation to wrench the muzzle in unsafe ways. It’s easier to punch the pistol at an angle to the side than it is to punch it straight out in front of your body. This keeps the pistol close to your body, so you can harness some extra core body strength. However, fellow shooters on the firing line don’t usually take kindly to muzzles pointed in their direction. If you need to use this motion to rack the slide, turn your body sideways in your shooting lane, so the muzzle is always pointing safely downrange. Finger Off the Trigger Keep that booger picker indexed along the pistol’s frame, well away from the trigger. You want it high and out of the way. Finger on the trigger only when you’re ready to fire! As you strongly squeeze the slide with your support hand, your natural instinct is to also squeeze the gun with your shooting hand, which could cause you to subconsciously slip that finger into the trigger guard and pull. This is called the sympathetic grip reflex, and it is seriously “no bueno.” The best way to prevent it from happening is to keep that trigger finger high up on the frame and well away from the trigger. Don’t Cover the Ejection Port The ejection port is the part of your pistol that all that hot brass comes flying out of when you shoot. Ejection port flinging hot brass out of a Sterling SMG Never cover the ejection port with your hand. Covering the port can trap a spent casing and prevent the chamber from being emptied when you rack the slide. This can cause a frustrating malfunction. Even worse…you could be struggling with the slide and accidentally punch a primer causing the case to split (This is admittedly rare but not outside the realm of possibilities). When the round detonates in the palm of your hand, it will cause an awful mess of blood and tissue that will really piss off your friendly neighborhood range safety officer. Parting Shots If you still find yourself struggling even after following our tips, keep practicing. I promise it gets easier over time. Not only will practice help you master the technique, it also helps loosen up the pistol’s recoil spring. Newer pistols have stiffer, stronger springs. With use, these springs tend to loosen up, making it easier to rack the slide. Owning and carrying a firearm is a huge responsibility, and shooters need to be able to operate their weapon self-sufficiently. Follow our tips and you’ll be racking the slide like a rockstar in no time. Have you ever had trouble racking the slide on your pistol? Did these tips make it easier? Do you have any tips of your own? Hit us up in the comments. Looking for some handgun recommendations for women (that don’t involve copious amounts of pink)? Check out our 7 Best Handguns for Women . Just some of the Best Handguns!

Handgun Review: CZ Czechmate is Worth Every Penny

Handgun Review: CZ Czechmate is Worth Every Penny

/* custom css */.td_uid_2_5f379d557043e_rand.td-a-rec-img { text-align: left; } .td_uid_2_5f379d557043e_rand.td-a-rec-img img { margin: 0 auto 0 0; } When it comes to performance and price, there are few competition handguns that have shot against the CZ Czechmate. I review a lot of guns and I rarely review a loser. There’s a reason for this; I’ve been shooting for more than 40 years, and I have a pretty good track record for passing by the losers without the trouble of spending time with them. I’m occasionally surprised, but most of the guns I test are pretty good. On the other side of this are the few guns that are simply surprisingly good. The CZ Czechmate is one of those guns. At SHOT Show, this January, I was looking for the gun I wanted to shoot in the Bianchi Cup this year. I’ve shot the Cup twice, once with a Metallic Class gun and once in Production. Iain Harrison offered me his 1911 race gun to try, just for fun on a plate range. I was amazed at its performance, and I decided then to try the 2013 Bianchi with an Open Class gun. I tried a couple of other guns and I’m committed to shooting the Czechmate. Affordable Performance As pistols go, the Czechmate is about as serious as you can go with an out-of-the-box competition gun. There are only a few companies that offer this type of gun, and the CZ is probably the lowest priced for what you get. It’s not as good as the guns the winners use; those guns probably would cost as much as three times the price of the Czechmate, and it’s not an inexpensive gun at just one cent less than $3,000. Having said this, for your $3K you get a lot more than just a gun. Related GunDigest Articles Handgun Review: New Ithaca 1911 CZ 805 Bren S1 Carbine Review Handgun Review: Sphinx SDP Best Starter Kit for Concealed Carry: S&W M&P 9 SHIELD $394.96 guns.com Safariland IWB Holster $43.99 brownells.com Safariland Duty Belt $88.99 brownells.com SnagMag Ammo Pouch $LOW! gundigeststore.com Disclosure: Some of these links are affiliate links. Caribou Media Group may earn a commission from qualifying purchases. Thank you! The Czechmate comes in a suitcase box loaded with accessories. There are four magazines, three 20-round and one 27-round. There is an extra barrel and compensator that convert the gun from a standard 9mm pistol to a 9mm that can handle up-loaded ammunition that will meet major caliber requirements. There is a magazine loader, a C-More competition holographic sight and mount, a standard nonadjustable iron rear sight and a charging handle that replaces the rear sight that makes cycling the slide easy with the optic installed. There are also wrenches and spare parts, including a spare extractor. This isn’t a perfect gun, but it is a very good gun that has qualities that make it a very good competition pistol. The slide runs on rails that are inside the frame, rather than on the inside of the slide. This reduces the mass of the slide, lowers the center of recoil and allows the side of the gun to be against a barricade without affecting the operation of the gun. The gun is easy to cycle and operate with the optic installed because of the operating handle, which can be mounted for a right- or left-handed shooter. There is an ambidextrous safety and the magazine release can be converted to operate from the right side of the gun. The first reaction when handling this gun is that it’s a big gun. The Czechmate is all steel and, while the grip panels are thin, the grip is wider than any single stack gun I know of. Additional Features The grip angle is a departure from the standard 1911 angle, but it is comfortable and ergonomic. The magazine release is large and easy to find and with a large magazine well, inserting a magazine is easy. I would have liked to have seen witness holes to allow a quick check of how many rounds remained. In shooting tactical, 3-gun and action matches like the Bianchi, this is a great convenience factor, and every company who makes competitive, high capacity pistols should provide this useful option. I like the shape of the Czechmate trigger. It’s a flat-faced trigger with an upturn at the very bottom to help the shooter interface with the same location on the trigger on every draw. The pull isn’t perfect for precision shooting. I’m an old rifle shooter so I’m really trigger sensitive; there’s just a bit of gritty feel in my test gun, not noticeable in fast shooting but there nonetheless. I shot the Czechmate with the drift adjustable metallic rear sight that comes on the gun, and I liked the sight. It’s nonadjustable, but there’s plenty of sight to allow for filing to the proper elevation with a specific load. The sight picture is an unencumbered blocky post and notch, exactly what I would want in a competition pistol.

Walther P1 [Review]: Milsurp Made Easy

Walther P1 [Review]: Milsurp Made Easy

Trending: Best Places to Buy Ammo Online and [Buyer's Guide] 7 Best AR-15s Ever wanted to snag a cold-war heater with some pretty interesting World War history behind its development? The Walther P1 might just be for you! We don’t usually dive into historical guns, but occasionally opportunities do arise to play around with some less-common guns – so why not? If you want to watch some awesome video of us shooting the Walther P1, take a look at our video review! And don’t forget to subscribe to the channel ! Table of Contents Loading... Wait, That Gun Looks Familiar… Good eye! The Walther P1 is a direct descendant of the iconic P38 issued to a good chunk of the various armed forces of Nazi Germany in the lead up to and during the second world war. Previously, the German military’s sidearm needs had been filled by the Luger P.08 – and while the Luger was by no means a bad pistol by any means, in true German fashion it was a bit needlessly complicated – especially when you’re planning to outfit a military gearing up to start a second global bar fight. Considering that sidearms were not a crucial part of the Third Reich’s military doctrine, it made sense to instead adopt a pistol that could be mass-produced at a cheaper per-unit cost than the Luger, as the P.08 required both significant labor hours and craftsmanship to create at the scale needed to sate the Wehrmacht’s demands. A cutaway schematic showing the operational guts of a P38. The P38 entered development in the mid-thirties, and by the time the design was finalized and operational, it could be produced for approximately 32 reichsmarks, and while conversion rate information for dead nazi money is sort of ambiguous, it appears as though that’d be about $14 USD. Using the same conversion, that works out to about $5 less than the Luger’s $19 USD cost per unit. Adjusted for inflation that is about $240 for the P38 and $330 for the Luger. To put that into some context, the U.S. Army paid roughly $560 per gun for the Beretta M9 (adjusted for inflation, we think). Multiply that by the ~million units produced between 1938 and 1945, and it’s easy to see how you’ve got a massive chunk of change saved by switching over to the P.38. The P38 was also an improvement over the Luger in a few areas as well. The gun was one of the first semi-automatic double-action pistols ever fielded. Beretta M9 Double Action Single Action Meaning that users could safely carry the gun with a round chambered and the hammer down, needing only to draw and squeeze the relatively long double-action trigger pull to fire. Obviously, after the first round was fired and the spent casing was ejected, the gun remained in a single action state for the rest of the magazine. The allied aerial bombing campaign that ruthlessly targeted German industrial manufacturing centers took its toll on the P38s production and distribution schedule, however, and the primary Walther plant located in Zehla Mellis was eventually captured by American soldiers and later destroyed by the Soviets in 1946. While nearly 1.2 million P38s were produced during the war, they never quite replaced the Luger entirely. Oh woops, was that your arms plant? haha my b Fast forward another 10 years to a Germany divided into East and West during the tensions of the Cold War. Fritz Walther and his brothers had set up shop in a new factory in Ulm, Southwest Germany, and had been lying low producing various goods while anticipating that an eventual West German Defense Force might someday need the firearms-making prowess of Walther again someday, and is it turns out, they were spot on. In 1956, the West German government announced the formation of the Bundeswehr, which is the modern German army as we know it. New Army, who dis? The Bundeswehr sometime in the late 50s. Shortly after, German authorities began soliciting designs for the Bundeswehr’s standard-issue sidearm. The Walther brothers had managed to save both patent details and some surviving war-time P38s, and after a trial, the P38 was once again selected to outfit the German military. The new production P.38s were dubbed the P1, and utilized an aluminum alloy frame over the P38s heavier steel, and saw an eventual switch to bakelite grips as well. So where’s that leave us today? To The Range! Weirdly enough, the Walther P1 specifically imported by P.W. Arms is on California’s roster of state-approved handguns. Thankfully much less intrusive import stampings than some of their other firearms to boot. Since the crown kindly consented to our ownership of this cool little almost-milsurp blaster, we snagged one pretty much just for funsies from Guns.com who nicely double-checked it was PW Arms imported. Walther P1 9mm 620 at Guns.com Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 620 at Guns.com Prices accurate at time of writing In no time at all, our relic was in hand and we were ready to sling lead downrange – 8 rounds at a time. Shooting the P1 is pretty strange, but not necessarily in a bad way? Right off the bat, it’s apparent that this is a very old gun design – but there are some familiar trappings of modernity that are a bit surprising here. First things first – we were unfortunate enough to be hit by a pretty gnarly dust storm when we went out to put some rounds through this bad boy, so excuse my homeless borderlands cosplay I’ve got going on here. I hate sand. It’s course, and rough, and irritating, and it gets everywhere… The P1 is overall pretty comfy and fits my hand reasonably well – though you’ll likely notice that the steel slide sitting on top of an alloy frame makes the gun feel a bit top-heavy. The fire controls are surprisingly modern, and it’s pretty obvious that Beretta wound up taking a good amount of design cues on the M9 from the P1 and P38. Look familiar? 👀 The safety and decocker sit on the left side of the gun and are reasonably accessible with a thumb flick – allowing you to chamber a round and safely drop the hammer if you’d like to carry the gun hot. The decocker and safety are readily accessible with a flick O’ the thumb. The slide release sits a little bit further forward, and feels simultaneously too small and too large. I’ll explain. When the slide is locked, finding and manipulating the slide release feels a bit fumbly – overall it’s got a much smaller profile than what you’d find on any modern handgun. It could just be my hands, but the thumb groove feels like it partially blocks the slide release. However, because of my weak side hand placement when shooting, I found that I was riding the slide release more or less constantly – which obviously prevents the slide from locking open on the last shot. A surefire way to make the gun not lock open on the last round! This isn’t really a fair criticism of the pistol per se, as it was developed well before shooting a handgun with two hands was remotely close to widespread or accepted. As mentioned above, the gun can be fired in a double-action mode initially if you don’t mind creeping through that long ass trigger pull – but the single-action trigger pull is quite smooth with minimal creep, a very obvious breaking point, and a clean reset. Single action firing is pretty damn pleasant. It’s been said that this gun isn’t very forgiving, and if you concentrate on the fundamentals, you’ll do just fine with it. I definitely found myself needing to slow down to take accurate shots, and the angry desert winds certainly didn’t help things, but I warmed up to the P1 pretty quickly – feeling reasonably confident with close up steel after a few mags or so. The team also had some fun in a local night shooting competition with the P1…note it’s not optimum if you’re looking to rank! Notably, the gun’s got the classic European style magazine release at the heel of the mag well. You’ll need to press back on the large tab on the bottom of the pistol grip to release the mag – which is obviously quite different to the trigger guard thumb releases we’re probably all used to as Americans. Strange, but certainly not impossible. I’m hesitant to criticize the design at all just because in our opinion,  this is much more of a fun conversation piece and plinker than anything we’d ever actually use or train for a defensive situation with, so take that as you will. Is the mag release sort of wonky? Sure, it’s weird because we’re not used to it, but if you find yourself in a situation where you get killed because you couldn’t reload your Cold War relic handgun fast enough, you’ve likely already made a series of questionable decisions to begin with 🤷‍♂️ The P1’s mag loaded with a snapcap. The mag itself holds 8 rounds of 9×19, just like the P.08. The mag’s solid and single stack, and we had no issues loading the rounds by hand. They’re also readily available for ~$18 a pop from Gun Mag Warehouse , which is nice considering the age and surplus nature of the gun! ProMag Walther P1 Magazine 18 at GunMag Warehouse Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 18 at GunMag Warehouse Prices accurate at time of writing It should be noted that while ProMag has a hit and miss reputation, these seem to be one of the hits. So far we haven’t had an issue and they come in a little cheaper than magazines from Walther. But if you want real Walther mags , those are for sale too! Walther P38, P1 Magazine 20 at GunMag Warehouse Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 20 at GunMag Warehouse Prices accurate at time of writing It’s worth noting that anecdotal internet evidence suggests that the guns are not rated for defensive +P or +P+ rounds – and we’ll go ahead and assume that someone probably injured themselves in the process of coming to this conclusion. On that note, this is actually a slightly later model P1 with a few interesting fixes. The switch over to an aluminum frame brought with it a few issues regarding wear and tear on where the frame contacts and engages the locking block, and a hex bolt has been added to alleviate this issue. The reinforcement bolt in question. Additionally, later model P1s are going to have a fatter slide – a fix introduced to mitigate apparent issues with slides cracking or stretching that may have been related to the higher pressure 9mm ammunition that became common after WW2. Chunky boi The fatter slide P1 is easily identifiable by the serrations near the safety and decocker that extend a bit forward of the safety markings themselves – thinner p1 slides only have serrations to the rear of the safety assembly. A super easy way to differentiate a “fat slide” P1. The gun’s slide is surprisingly easy to manipulate, and the action is quite smooth. Being a little bit more used to the slides and recoil slings found on glocks, the P1 is downright buttery in comparison, though we did run into a few issues while shooting it. The P1 ran through an entire box of Blazer 115gr ball with absolutely no issues – but switching over to American Eagle ball began producing bizarre failures to extract that jammed up the gun due to the pressure the slide exerted on the magazine. Pictured: WELP Unlike a lot of other FTEs, these were odd in that it looked like the gun started to extract the casing, but lost its hold on it for whatever reason – thus leaving a partially extracted spent cartridge bound up in the action as the gun’s slide returned and attempted to chamber another live round. The slide’s relative ease of operation proved to be super useful here, as I was able to bring the slide rearward with one hand just enough to take the pressure off the magazine, drop the mag, and clear the malfunction. Assessing the jam before attempting to clear it. We’ve never really had any issues with AE previously, so we’re not sure what exactly caused this, but it did seem to be isolated specifically to the American Eagle 9mm. Using one hand to pull the slide bag, I was able to drop the mag and clear the obstruction. We wouldn’t be surprised if a Milsurp gun that’d be eligible for AARP discount at Denny’s if it were a human was a little bit picky about the ammo you feed it for arbitrary, esoteric reasons. The P1 also includes the P38’s loaded chamber indicator – providing a visual aid to the shooter via a small pin that extends rearward when a round is chambered that the gun is hot. A very obvious visual indicator that you’re hot, boiiiiii A neat feature and certainly ahead of it’s time, but ultimately one of the pieces of classic German over-engineering that was eventually deemed to be too difficult to execute for the payoff provided. However, far more features found in the P38 and P1 did continue on into the future – such as the decocker, safety, double action trigger, and locking block, which are all very conspicuously present in the US Military’s Beretta M9 pistols, among many other less prolific designs. By The Numbers Reliabilit y 3.5/5 The fact that ammunition from one particular manufacturer consistently induced failures to eject is a bit concerning – but the issue may not have been the gun itself. While we unfortunately didn’t have too many different types of 9mm to play with, the P1 ran just fine with normal Blazer 115, and as we mentioned, we really wouldn’t want to run anything outside of ball through this old geezer. Accuracy 5/5 While certainly not an easy gun to shoot, the P1 will absolutely shoot to your ability. Once you really get a feel for the trigger and the gun’s quirks, putting rounds on target is a relative breeze – it might just feel a bit odd if you’re used to modern handguns. Take your time and it’ll do its job! Ergonomics 3.5/5 This doesn’t feel quite fair to dock points consider the dated design of the gun, but a few things are a bit wonky ergonomically on the P1. Fire controls can feel odd to manipulate if you aren’t used to them, and a modern grip can cause the gun’s slide to fail to lock to the rear on an empty mag. Overall however, the P1 is quite comfortable and points nicely once you’ve got the hang of it. Looks 5/5 There is something undeniably cool about the burgeoning modern-ness of the P1’s design. It sits somewhere between the intersection of almost crude old-world handgun design, typical German flair and industriousness, and newly implemented advancements in pistol design that’d survive well on into the modern day. In a word – iconic! Customization 1/5 While not any sort of negative reflection on the gun itself, we probably don’t have to tell you that there isn’t too much in the way of aftermarket accessories available for a 60+ year old German handgun. That black leather, tho Surplus and reproduction leather belt holsters are decently accessible, but if you’ve got some sort of bizarre fantasy about tricking this thing out with a brake or RMR, you’re SOL for off the shelf solutions. P38 WW2 Replica Holster 37 at Amazon Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 37 at Amazon Prices accurate at time of writing Bang for the Buck 3/5 This one’s a bit tricky, as it’s all going to depend on how much you value history, as that’s obviously the main selling point here. The P1 generally runs about $600 or so in good condition, which isn’t too bad as far as historical firearms go. However, obviously you can snag a Glock for about that much too if any sort of practical applications are more your concern. You’re going to have to make that judgement call yourself. Overall 4/5 All in all, the Walther P1 is a rad little piece of history that still shoots great! The design is obviously dated, but we presume you wouldn’t be here if you didn’t already know that. If that’s your thing, the P1 sits right in that sweet spot of being a fun collector’s piece that you won’t feel bad about shooting. Conclusion I’ve said it before, but I’m a huge history nerd, and firearms that hold any sort of historic importance or value have always fascinated me. On that note, it’s really cool to get some rounds through what, realistically, is a snapshot frozen in time on the grand scale of handgun evolution. If you find yourself in a similar mindset, I probably don’t need to tell you that the P1 is a fun toy that you’ll probably have just as much fun with as I did. Walther P1 9mm 620 at Guns.com Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 620 at Guns.com Prices accurate at time of writing That being said – this is still firmly a novelty gun and certainly not anything we’d advocate carrying or using for defense purposes, though I’m almost positive we’ll get at least on dissertation on why the P38 is the perfect home defense handgun in the comments section below – and I assure you I will not read said comment. What is your favorite milsurp or almost-milsurp gun? Is it American or did it have to immigrate to get here? Let us know in the comments! For some awesome ideas to expand your own collection, take a look at the Best Military Surplus Rifles (That You Can Still Buy) !

Anschutz Pricing & Reference

/* custom css */.td_uid_2_5f379cb8c0ba4_rand.td-a-rec-img { text-align: left; } .td_uid_2_5f379cb8c0ba4_rand.td-a-rec-img img { margin: 0 auto 0 0; } From the Standard Catalog of Firearms Know what your Anschutz firearms are worth with this up-to-date 8-page Anschutz pricing .PDF download from the Standard Catalog of Firearms. * Completely updated pricing for Anschutz firearms with new entries and photos * Value Trackers: Real-life auction results * Sleeper Alerts: Collectible guns that are outpacing the market Learn what these Anschutz firearms are worth: Anschutz Mark 10 Target Rifle Anschutz Model 1403D Anschutz 1407 Anschutz 1408 Anschutz 1411 Anschutz Model 1413 Match Anschutz Model 1416D HB Classic Anschutz Model 1416D KL Classic Anschutz Model 1416D Custom Anschutz Model 1418D KL Mannlicher Anschutz Model 1418/19 Anschutz Model 1433D Anschutz Model 1449D Youth Anschutz Model Woodchucker Anschutz Model 1451E Target Anschutz Model 1451R Sporter Target Anschutz Model 1451D Custom Anschutz Model 1451D Classic Anschutz Model 1516D KL Classic Anschutz Model 1516D KL Custom Anschutz Model 1517D Classic Anschutz Model 1517D HB Classic Anschutz Model 1517D Monte Carlo Anschutz Model 1517MPR Multi Purpose Rifle Anschutz Model 1518D Mannlicher Anschutz Model 184 Anschutz Model 54 Sporter Anschutz Model 54M Anschutz Model 141 Anschutz Model 141M Anschutz Model 164 Anschutz Model 164M Anschutz Model 153 Anschutz Model 153-S Anschutz Model 64 Anschutz Model 64MS Anschutz Model 64 MPR Anschutz Model 64P Anschutz Model 64P Mag Anschutz Model 54.18MS Anschutz Model 54.MS REP Anschutz Model 2000 MK Anschutz Model 2007 Supermatch Anschutz Model 2013 Supermatch Anschutz Model 1903D Anschutz Model 1803D Anschutz Model 1808D RT Super Anschutz Model 1907ISU Standard Match Anschutz Model 1910 Super Match II Anschutz Model Prone Match Anschutz Model 1913 Super Match Anschutz Model 1827B Biathlon Anschutz Model 1827BT Biathlon Anschutz Achiever Anschutz Super Target Anschutz Bavarian 1700 Anschutz Classic 1700 Anschutz Custom 1700 Anschutz Model 1700 Mannlicher "Anschutz Model 1700" FWT Anschutz Model 1700 FWT Deluxe Anschutz Model 1710 D Classic "Anschutz Model 1710" D HB Classic Anschutz Model 1710 D KL Monte Carlo Anschutz Model 1710 D HB Classic 150 Years Anniversary Version Anschutz Model 1712 Silhouette Sporter Anschutz Model 1702 D HB Classic Anschutz Model 1502 D HB Classic Anschutz Model 1907 Club Anschutz Model 1717 D Classic "Anschutz Model 1717" D HB Classic Anschutz Model 1730 D Classic "Anschutz Model 1730" D HB Classic Anschutz Model 1730 D KL Monte Carlo Anschutz Model 1733D KL Mannlicher Anschutz Model 1740 D Classic "Anschutz Model 1740" D HB Classic Anschutz Model 1740 D KL Monte Carlo Anschutz Model 520/61 Anschutz Model 525 Sporter Anschutz Exemplar Anschutz Exemplar XIV Anschutz Exemplar Hornet

NWTF Super Elite 4.0 by ALPS OutdoorZ: A Turkey Vest for Every Hunter

ALPS OutdoorZ and the National Wild Turkey Federation have partnered together to release a line of quality, dual-branded turkey-hunting gear including vests and pack systems, furniture, gun cases and ground blinds. Included in this new line of gear is the Super Elite 4.0 turkey hunting vest. “We are very excited about getting the opportunity to help bring back the Super Elite to the turkey-hunting community. Working closely with Mossy Oak and the NWTF we really thought about what features of the classic vest that worked well, what could be improved on and what could be added to help better accommodate the modern-day turkey hunter without changing the overall classic vest design that so many people love,” said Zach Scheidegger, ALPS product manager. The Super Elite 4.0 features a total of 22 pockets, including two large slate call pockets, three striker pockets, a box call pocket, two mesh diaphragm call pockets and an easy-access cell phone pocket. In addition to the multitude of pockets, a removable 2.5-inch thick foldaway seat allows you to sit anywhere without having to carry an extra seat. A blood-proof, breathable game pocket is included for carrying gear out to the field or game back from the field. "The Super Elite" 4.0 is constructed using a quiet cotton liner and has breathable mesh panels throughout. Super Elite 4.0 Features: 22 total pockets Quiet cotton liner Removable 2.5″ thick fold-away seat cushion with quick release buckle attachments Easy access cell phone chest pocket Two large slate call pockets with padded dividers Three striker pockets Protective and silent box call pocket Two mesh diaphragm call pockets Mesh panels throughout Blood-proof breathable game bag Mossy Oak® Obsession™ fabric Available in two sizes: Medium/Large (chest sizes 38″-44″) X-Large/XX-Large (chest sizes 44″-52″) The NWTF is a non-profit organization dedicated to the conservation of wild turkey and the preservation of turkey hunting for future generations. To learn more about the NWTF please visit www.nwtf.org . To learn more about the brand new, Super Elite 4.0 turkey hunting vest, and all of the products in the ALPS OutdoorZ Extreme line, please visit www.alpsoutdoorz.com .

Summary

Advertisment The . 30 Carbine cartridge is an interesting one, with an interesting history. It’s not a round most people are familiar with, despite its impact on the world.